Breakfast Might Be The Missing Key To Weight Loss

March 28, 2010 at 12:31 pm | Posted in Health & Nutrition, Lifestyle | 1 Comment
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If you have been working on losing fat (you will understand the importance of focusing on fat loss rather than weight loss if you have read our blogs on this subject) but the results are not happening there may be a simple explanation.

It could be what you have for breakfast.

GI News LogoIn the March 2010 GI Newsletter (click on the logo for their blog) there were several very interesting pieces of research.

“Why breakfast is important is that it breaks the longest time your body goes without incoming food so what you eat affects your blood glucose and insulin levels more than meals and snacks later in the day.”

The importance of breakfast cannot be under estimated.

“What you eat for breakfast is what really matters. A healthy low GI breakfast can sustain you until lunchtime, prime your metabolism to burn fat and reduce your day-long insulin levels more effectively than any other single dietary change. It’s easy to put together. It just needs some:

  • Low GI carbs. Why? They trickle glucose into the blood stream, fill you up, give you energy and can reduce your day-long insulin levels more effectively than any other single dietary change.
  • Protein. Why? It’s the feel-fuller-for-longer nutrient, keeping hunger pangs at bay between meals. It also lowers the glycemic load (by replacing some of the carbohydrate).
  • Fruit and/or vegetables. Why? A high fruit and veg intake is consistently linked with better health. If you don’t have some for breakfast it will be hard to achieve your daily target (2 serves of fruit and 5 of vegetables is recommended in Australia, for example)What you eat for breakfast is what really matters. A healthy low GI breakfast can sustain you until lunchtime, prime your metabolism to burn fat and reduce your day-long insulin levels more effectively than any other single dietary change. It’s easy to put together. It just needs some:
    • Low GI carbs. Why? They trickle glucose into the blood stream, fill you up, give you energy and can reduce your day-long insulin levels more effectively than any other single dietary change.
    • Protein. Why? It’s the feel-fuller-for-longer nutrient, keeping hunger pangs at bay between meals. It also lowers the glycemic load (by replacing some of the carbohydrate).
    • Fruit and/or vegetables. Why? A high fruit and veg intake is consistently linked with better health. If you don’t have some for breakfast it will be hard to achieve your daily target (2 serves of fruit and 5 of vegetables is recommended in Australia, for example)

    Choose foods from each column and prime your metabolism to burn fat:”

     

And if all of that is not enough to get you thinking about eating breakfast and what you eat for breakfast then this bit of news will really get you going!

New research published in the Journal Of Nutrition highlights the benefits of eating breakfast before you exercise.

A low GI breakfast prior to exercise increases fat oxidation (the conversion of fat to energy) compared to a higher GI breakfast.

It’s all food for thought

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Low Carb Cheesecake

March 10, 2010 at 10:03 pm | Posted in Healthy Recipes | Leave a comment
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A family favourite. Tastes superb and just as wicked as you would expect – but with far fewer carbs!

Although the preparation time is short, with up to 1½ hours cooking and time to cool before dressing, this is best made either the day before or earlier in the day.

 

Ingredients:

  • 3 packages (total of 750 grams) cream cheese (room temperature)
  • 4 eggs (room temperature)
  • 1½ teaspoon (½ tablespoon) vanilla
  • 1½ teaspoon (½ tablespoon) lemon juice
  • 1⅓ cups sugar equivalent of artificial sweetener
  • ¼ cup sour cream

Crust:

  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 2 tablespoon melted butter
  • 2 tablespoon sugar equivalent in artificial sweetener

Preparation:

Heat oven to 375o F (190o C).

Combine ingredients for crust, and press into the bottom of a spring-form pan. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until fragrant and beginning to brown. Raise oven heat to 400o F (200o C), or lower to 350o F (175o C)if you’re using a water bath (see below).

Put cream cheese in mixing bowl, and beat until fluffy. Add other ingredients, scraping the bowl and beaters each time (this is very important), fully incorporating each ingredient. When all ingredients are combined, scrape one more time, beat one more minute, and pour mixture into pan over crust.

Instructions for water bath: Wrap the bottom and sides of the spring-form pan in foil, put it in a baking pan and pour boiling water around the sides. Bake at 350o F (175o C) for 60 to 90 minutes, checking often. When the cake is firm to touch but slightly soft in the centre, or the centre reaches 155o F (70o C), remove from oven.

Instructions for non-water bath: For this method, you start the cake at a high temperature, and it slowly drops. Put the cheesecake on a sheet pan in case of drippage. After putting the cheesecake in the oven at 400o F (200o C), turn the oven down to 200o F (95o C). Bake for 60 to 90 minutes, checking often after an hour. When the cake is firm to touch but slightly soft in the centre, or the centre reaches 155o F (70o C), remove from oven.

Chill completely. Top with fruit, if desired, or serve with pureed berry fruit.   Serves 16

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